Find local businesses in New Brunswick

New Brunswick: still the only officially bilingual province of Canada

Yes, the province of New Brunswick remains the only province that is officially bilingual: everything is done in both languages. New Brunswick was born in 1784, when Britain decided to claim Nova Scotia as part of its growing family and renamed it in honour of the German duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg.

The population is particularly homogeneous, with only 2 per cent of its approximately 750,000 inhabitants answering yes to 'are you part of a visible minority?' In comparison, the average borders on 20 per cent across the rest of the country. About one third of the population is francophone, and both sides of the linguistic fence are represented in theatre, dance and other artistic activities. It is surprising to find no fewer than 14 art galleries here.

New Brunswick lives primarily off its mines (zinc, copper and bismuth), its fishing (its delicious crabs and lobsters) and its fish farms (salmon, trout, etc.), not to mention about 30 wells from which natural gas is extracted.

Tourism plays a major part in the economy and local life. New Brunswick is home to nine provincial parks and, of course, the famous Acadian village located near Caraquet, which reminds us of the beautiful — and difficult — Acadian history. One of the pleasures of visiting New Brunswick lies in crossing the 12.9-km Confederation Bridge that stretches over the Atlantic Ocean to connect the province to Prince Edward Island.


Business listings in New Brunswick

Cities in New Brunswick

If you can't find your location in the above list, use the alphabetical menu below

Cities in New Brunswick that start with: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Landmarks in New Brunswick

If you can't find your landmark in the above list, use the alphabetical menu below

Landmarks in New Brunswick that start with: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

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