By Stephanie Dickison Mark your calendar - ​On Sunday, March 20, 2016, from 2pm to 5pm, Artscape Daniels Spectrum is being transformed into a vegan bakery and sweet shop. This year's ‪8th Annual Totally Fabulous Vegan Bake-Off will feature 12 categories of treats to choose from. Some of the purveyors on hand this year include: Apiecalypse Now!, Eat What’s Good, Fairly Frosted, Grains Grains Grains, and Unbaked Cake Co. Tickets are $10 for two plates of treats or $15 for three plates.

By Stephanie Dickison ​In a city that is overwhelming crowded with single ingredient restaurants – poutine, hot dogs, grilled cheese – sometimes it leaves you craving a heartier selection. Kasai Grill House on College in Little Italy offers a vast menu of Korean grilled items and Japanese selections. The best part? It’s all you can eat and at a great price: $21.99 for ages 10-64, $16.99 for those 65+, and $13.99 for kids 5-9 years old. This is the first venture for owners Yan Li and William Liu, but they have expert help. Yan’s father John owns restaurant Sushi World just down the block at 281 College St. He’ll be here doing more sushi, "a different style of sushi than the usual," says Yan, in the new year. Kasai means "fire" and highlights the Korean grill portion of the dinner only menu. The other half of the menu includes Japanese options such as maki rolls, hand rolls, sushi and seaweed salad. "Trying to improve the tastes and flavours you find in karaoke bars," Yan Li has installed an exhaust system in each table, ensuring a smoke-free Korean BBQ experience. Choose from lots of meat, veg and seafood options and be sure to save room for dessert (5 cakes and 4 ice creams) – it’s included in the price. The restaurant is spacious, with seats for 76, so it’s a great spot for groups. AYCE allows for the opportunity to try different dishes - have kimchi to start one day, and a fried mini bun and miso soup the next.  Try short ribs and red sausage on the grill, or whip up some bacon, beef and chicken for the table. Seafood options include salmon, shrimp, squid, fish fillets, and mussels. If you go on a weekend, you can enjoy a variety of vegetables wrapped in slices of tender beef. The restaurant is currently waiting on a liquor license. In the meantime, enjoy soft drinks with a free refill. Check out our Facebook page for more photos. (Note: They will be closed December 25)

By Patricia Noonan Chef: Tyson Liebrecht WhereAngolino Describe your current food style: Classic Italian, rustic, focus on local ingredients and suppliers. Training: George Brown College, Culinary Management Diploma 2009-11, Italian Culinary Post Graduate Program 2011-12, ALMA International School of Italian Cuisine, Colorno, Italy 2011. Places you have travelled to inform your culinary skills: Italy: Emilia Romagna, Piedmonte. Restaurants you've worked: Most recently Bosk at the Shangri-La Hotel Toronto for three years. I worked at the Michelin starred Antica Corte Pallavicina while in Italy, and here in Toronto I’ve worked at Vertical, and Paganelli’s. I was on the opening team at Real Sports while I was in school. Biggest culinary influence: I came to Toronto for the Italian program at George Brown College. The program offered the opportunity to travel to Italy to study and that is the experience I was seeking having come from a design background. Definitely my chef and mentor Gabriele Paganelli who I met and worked for during school has been the biggest influence on my current style and outlook. He produces the best salumi I have ever tasted. Fantasy meal: While staying Tuscany, we came across a small, unassuming restaurant in the hillside town of San Donato. The space was cozy and inviting, reminiscent of my grandmother’s dining room. Traditional salumi made from their own animals, fresh pasta with wild boar ragu, a perfect risotto made with radicchio, and roasted guinea hen - all paired with an endless supply of their house made red. Desserts full of booze like an amazing zabaglione made with Marsala and poured over gelato encased in a crunchy meringue. Locally raised, fresh ingredients, treated with respect, and made with love. Favourite food/wine pairing: A hearty wild boar ragu and a tasty Valpolicella. Junk food passion: I like making my own, but Popeye’s fried chicken! Comfort food: Sansotei Ramen, unless Mom’s in town and she’s making cabbage rolls. Fave Toronto resto: So many choices, but at the moment I have to say my favourite meal has been from Boralia. Fave Toronto bar: My favourite bar serves up amazing food - Thoroughbred on Richmond Street. Cookbook you cannot live without: Anything by Ruhlman, but lately I’ve been studying Keller’s Bouchon Bakery, and Flour + Water by Thomas McNaughton. Most important tool in the kitchen: A good sharp knife. What’s exciting about the industry for you still: It is constantly changing but there’s always a place for everyone. What entices me most about this career is that it offers a life long education if you are up for it.

By Stephanie Dickison

By Stephanie Dickison

By Stephanie Dickison

By Stephanie Dickison

By Stephanie Dickison This year a host of exciting celebrity chefs are cooking for a good cause at this Saturday’s KitchenAid Cook for the Cure Culinary Showdown. Take a look:

By Stephanie Dickison Applications are now open for the prestigious international contest, S.Pellegrino Young Chef 2016. If you have been working full-time as "chef de cuisine," "chef de partie" or "sous chef" for at least one year in restaurant(s)/catering companies – and not necessarily in the same place for the whole period – and you are 30 years old or younger, you can now apply for the chance to become this year’s winner. Find out all the details, official rules and download the application. Applications are due by March 31, 2016. Good luck!

By Stephanie Dickison The openings in Toronto continue to blanket the city. So much so, this week I bring you a staggering 13, including the one at Pearson. At only two weeks before Christmas, this is completely unprecedented. And so very exciting.

By Stephanie Dickison

By Rose Reisman There is always either a social or business occasion where we want to get together with friends or colleagues to "break bread". Entertaining in one's home gives you the privacy you want but that also requires an enormous amount of work. Toronto has its fair share of restaurants featuring private dining rooms where you feel you are in the ambiance of your own space. Whether you're still making plans for this holiday season or already thinking about the New Year, I've had the opportunity to dine in some wonderful private dining rooms. Here's just a few great ones for 2012: Oliver and Bonacini on Front Street has a spacious and beautifully designed private dining room with complete affordable menus for breakfast, brunch, lunch, dinner or receptions. They hold up to about 40 people. This location has one of the best views of Toronto's busiest downtown corners. I was at a dinner where the meal featured their famous O & B Mushroom soup, salmon with a lentil and grain pilaf and the decadent chocolate torte with hazelnut praline. To die for! Earl's, the trendy west coast chain, located in the heart of the financial district has a private dining room for up to 45 seated diners or for 100 people for a standing reception. You couldn't get more chic in terms of environment, food and people than Earls. The international menu caters to all tastes. If you're planning a reception you have to include the tuna poke nachos, the california prawn pesto pizza and the yam fries! Scarpetta located at the Thompson Hotel is in the trendy King St West village. The Italian menu is a combination of both traditional and classic Italian cuisine. The private room holds up to 18 guests and I suggest making sure your menu includes the braised short ribs risotto and the Mediterranean branzino fish. Glow Fresh Grill has an art deco private dining room on the lower level that blocks out all sounds and people. The decor is funky and architecturally beautiful and can seat up to 35 people. The menu features seasonal and lighter cuisine. A must for your menu should include the selection of the "Mozzarella Bar" featuring Niagara naturally raised prosciutto with roasted peppers and balsamic glaze, as well as the mini baked crab cakes with spiced tahini sauce.

By Mario Fiorucci This month, Mario Fiorucci interviews Professor Richard P. Bazinet, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto. Mario: Let’s start off with a bit of background. You’re a professor at the University of Toronto in the Department of Nutritional Sciences. What’s the focus of your research? Prof. Bazinet: Thank you, Mario. I have a bit of a different background; I am a neuroscientist in a nutrition department. I am interested in how we feed the brain, especially how fatty acids enter and are used in the brain for both health and disease. Traditionally, the fats that I’m looking for were only found in foods like fish, and not in beef and other animals, however there are exceptions and I think that’s why we’re here today as when we look at grassfed beef, we find the healthy fats we use to feed our brains. Mario: OK so let’s back up and get an overall understanding of fat before heading into the specifics. In the chart you sent me you measured the ratio of Linoleic Acid to alpha-Linolenic Acid... just saying that clouds up my head, let’s take a step back. What is fat? And what do the specific acids you tested have to do with fat? Prof. Bazinet: Fat is an essential part of our diet, just like protein. Now, there are three types of fat: Saturated, Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated. No matter what fat you eat it will likely contain saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fat, but at different proportions. You can easily distinguish the main component of a fat based on whether it’s a solid or liquid at room temperature and in your fridge. Butter is a good example of a fat composed mainly of saturated fat, and it’s solid at room temperature. Olive oil is a good example of a fat composed mainly of monounsaturated fat, it’s a liquid at room temperature, but solid when refrigerated. A vegetable oil is an example of a fat composed mainly of polyunsaturated fat, and it’s liquid both at room temperature and in a fridge. Fatty acids are the building blocks of fats. During digestion, our bodies break down the fat into fatty acids, which can then be absorbed into the blood. Saturated fat can be made up of over 30 types of saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fat can be made up of a dozen or so types of mono-unsaturated fatty acids, and polyunsaturated fat can be made up of over 20 types of poly-unsaturated fatty acids. But, out of all those 60+ fatty acids, only two are known as “essential fatty acids”. And they are referred to as essential because our bodies cannot synthesize them, we must eat them to survive. Those two essential fatty acids are alpha-linolenic acid ("ALA"), an omega-3 fatty acid, and linoleic acid ("LA"), an omega 6 fatty acid. Mario: Is the fact that ALA and LA are “essential fatty acids” that you analyzed them? Prof. Bazinet: No, generally we get more than enough ALA and LA in our diets... the last case of essential fatty acid deficiency we saw was in 1982. But what we’ve learned is that in our diets today we get too much of the Omega 6s relative to the Omega 3s, and to a certain extent they fight with each other. So you might be getting enough Omega 3s from a quantity perspective, but if you’re getting far too much Omega 6s, it might be detrimental to our health. In my area of brain health, we have evidence that too we consume too much Omega 6s relative to Omega 3s. So, it turns out when you analyze beef, from what I’ll call a commodity or conventional supplier, they are feeding grain and corn, which are high sources of Omega 6s, and so the meat from the cows become high sources of Omega 6s and poor sources of Omega 3s. The ratio of Omega 6-to-Omega 3 in a “standard” piece of beef is about 30-to-1. Mario: And what is the ratio of Omega 6 to 3 we should be aiming to eat for optimum health? Prof. Bazinet: In general the majority of nutritionists say we should eat an omega-6 to omega-3 ratio of about 5 to 1. What this means is in our diet, we should eat about 5 times more linoleic acid than a-linolenic acid. Some nutritionals will go as far as saying the ratio should be closer to 2:1 and some even say 10:1 is ok. Without getting too far into it this, the bottom line is that the ratio from "standard" beef is far from being healthy for us. When cows consume corn and grain, the balance of Omega 6 to Omega 3 is off-the-charts in the wrong direction. I was raised in the nutritional sciences, and studied nutrition my entire life, and I generally accepted that that’s just how beef is. And then about 6 years ago a Toronto food writer, Mark Schatzker, came to me and said I had to analyze some of these exotic steaks he had. So I did, and the ratios were completely different. Not marginal differences, we’re talking massive difference - 30:1 vs. 2:1. And that leads us to the study I did. Mario: So you purchased steaks around Toronto? Prof. Bazinet: Yup, I purchased steaks from various butcher shops, grocery stores, and farmers markets and tested the Omega 6 to Omega 3 ratio. And the ratios ranged from 1.8:1 all the way to a relatively unhealthy 38.0:1 – just a huge range. Mario: This is the part that makes me happy, being an owner of The Healthy Butcher, since our steaks dominated first, second and third place. The 2nd and 3rd place were steaks from Firstlight, being 100% Grassfed Wagyu that we exclusively import from New Zealand. Firstlight’s beef is amazing because not only is it healthy as you tested, but it’s also a spectacular eating experience because the combination of the wagyu breed and consistent pastures produces perfect marbling and an amazing flavour. The only steak that displaced the Firstlight beef from New Zealand was a local farm called Pure Island Beef in Manitoulin Island, also exclusive to The Healthy Butcher in Toronto. The husband and wife team Jim and Birgit take a very scientific approach to it, and create heylage by cutting grass at it’s optimal peak of nutrition to counter the seasonality issue in Ontario, a huge challenge for beef farmers since half the year we don’t have grass. The thing that bothers me is that I know many retailers and suppliers label their beef as grassfed, when they cows are still finished on grain and corn. To me, that’s pure deceptive marketing... unfortunately, we don’t have a legally regulated definition of grassfed. Any butcher shop or grocery store can label their beef as “grassfed” since at some point in its life, all beef have consumed grass... but the key is for the beef cow to have exclusively eaten grass, we like to say 100% grassfed. Your test results showed a huge range, is there a cutoff where you know for sure the beef aren’t 100% grassfed? Prof. Bazinet: I would say that any steak that tests with a ratio of 8 or higher was fed corn or grains. Certainly, the bottom four steaks I tested are without a doubt from cows that have consumed a lot of grain. And from an Omega 6-to-Omega 3 ratio perspective, those steaks do not provide the same benefits associated with a lower ratio, and compound the problem in our diet today of consuming too much Omega 6. Now, when I purchased the steaks I asked the person at the counter for a grassfed steak and I took their word for it, except of course that I have the instrumentation to test it after the fact. One steak that was labelled as grassfed returned a 23.6:1 ratio and I don’t believe it, while the cow may have eaten some grass, the results clearly show it was getting the fat from corn. Mario: So, if we look at the results for the grassfed steaks, there is still a lot of variance. A steak with a ratio of 1.8:1 is more than three times healthier than a steak with a ratio of 5.6:1, how do you account for the variance? Prof. Bazinet: Many factors at play, including: The type of grasses being consumed; the point in time when the cow is eating the grass since the nutritional profile of grass changes as it gets bigger; the health of the soil; the genetics of the cow; and there will be variance even from one cut to another in the same animal. I would say the margin of error from the tests I performed is about +/-1. The real conclusion here is that there is still some variance between one steak and another, despite the "grassfed" label. Mario: And of course that The Healthy Butcher sells the healthiest grassfed steaks! Hahaha Prof. Bazinet: I guess one could conclude that, yes. Hahaha Mario: Would a consumer be able to measure this ratio at home for their own knowledge? Prof. Bazinet: No they can’t. My equipment is very sophisticated and costly. To measure these steaks, first I had to apply a bit of chemistry to extract the fat from the food. Then, I rely on something called gas chromatography which can isolate the fatty acids. Finally with the help of special detectors, I can identify and quantify them. Unfortunately, this is not something consumers can test for. But, we are here as a resource and it is possible to nutritionally test the meat. Mario: Let me broaden our look at the nutritional profile of grassfed beef. If the Omega 6:3 ratio of a grassfed cow is much better as compared to a cow that’s been fed grains or corn, certainly the nutritional profile overall is healthier. Are there other nutrients, vitamins, minerals, or other characteristics that we should be looking at? I have read studies that show that grassfed beef contains higher levels of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), and that CLA helps weight loss, reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes and cancer. Weston Price talks about vitamin K2 and how the liver of grassfed beef was prized and fed to brides-to-be to promote healthy pregnancy and healthy infants. Bottom line question is, moving away from the Omega 6:3 ratio, and looking at the broad nutritional picture, what other benefits are their of 100% grassfed beef compared to conventionally raised, grain-finished beef? Prof. Bazinet: So some of this is outside of my expertise. However, I have heard and a lot of people are talking about other benefits from a pasture/grass feeding model. Some of these issues range from animal health and ethics and even ecological issues. I think these are really important and timely, but I am not prepared to comment on them. However, in terms of other nutrients, you are absolutely correct. Grass is full of vitamins and phytonutrients. There is no doubt they also get into the meat and contribute to its nutrition. For example, there is research that shows that 100% grassfed beef has more antioxidants like Vitamin E. At this time, I am not measuring those, but hopefully we can look at this in the future to get a bigger picture. Mario: The natural question that likely will come up in our audiences minds is: Why don’t we just eat the grass directly? Prof. Bazinet: It would go right through you. Our bodies can’t digest grass like cows. They have a rumen that can break them down and extract the nutrients, and then we eat the meat and get those nutrients. And grass is one of the largest biomasses on the planet, so there is a lot of grass in the world to feed the animals. Mario: Last question, a few weeks back, the World Health Organization (WHO) released a study that concluded that red meat is a "probable human carcinogen". The one thing that really bothers me is that the WHO defines "red meat" as all mammalian muscle meat, including beef, veal, pork, lamb, mutton, horse, and goat, which of course is a broad spectrum of animals. And further, no differences are pointed out in how the animals were raised and what they ate. Do you believe that the findings would be different for 100% grass fed beef vs. Grain/corn finished beef? I’m quite certain that the vast majority of the studies were based on conventional meat. Prof. Bazinet: Oh I would say not just the majority, but all of it is based on conventional meat. I’m really interested in this also. So as a scientist, because the studies have not been done, I have to say I don’t know. However, I think this is a great question and worth looking into. If you look at meat and the risk of cardiovascular disease, it is a bit complex. While increased dietary processed meat is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, unprocessed meat isn’t, at least according to the largest studies on the topic so far. Now the question is, do pasture-based and grass-fed animals, with all their omega-3s and other phytonutrients outperform regular meat which outperforms processed meat? For cardiovascular disease? Or what about cancer as in the WHO report? The studies have not been done, but one can definitely make a case – an argument - that they might. This is the complexity in nutrition, we have to make decisions without having the data in front of us. By identifying the large differences in nutritional quality between the products, hopefully we can stimulate others to look for answers to those studies. Mario: Professor, thank you for taking the time today to talk, and even more so for taking it upon yourself to perform these tests and help us understand our food better. The world needs many more people like you!

By Stephanie Dickison George Brown College’s Centre for Hospitality and Culinary Arts (CHCA) announced they are offering a postgraduate program in wine and beverage business management starting in 2015. A first-of-its-kind program, The Advanced Wine and Beverage Business Management postgraduate program allows students to "gain superior knowledge of beverage alcohol products and acquire skills in financial management, business management, human resources, marketing and communications." So if you've ever wanted a career as a beverage director, sales agent, territory manager, product consultant, brand ambassador, wine steward/cellar master, specialty retail operation, portfolio manager, and as merchandising/inventory coordinator, this is for you. The program is full time, completed over three semesters through George Brown’s School of Hospitality and Tourism Management. "The core of what we wish to achieve through this program would be to have well-trained graduates with professional knowledge of the alcohol beverage industry," says Dario Guescini, Chair, School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, CHCA. “Students will master the areas of wine, beer, mixology, food pairing, and then expand on those fundamentals with an understanding of food and beverage business management. They will also have the opportunity to learn though field placements at wineries, breweries and distilleries." For more details on the Advanced Wine and Beverage Business Management program visit George Brown's postgraduate program page.

By Stephanie Dickison Whether you're traveling or simply want to grab a bite while you're downtown, you've got to check out DEQ Lounge at The Ritz-Carlton Hotel. Laid back and casual yet still hotel luxe, DEQ has launched a new menu that is all about Canadian comfort food. It's the ideal menu - approachable and familiar items feature premium ingredients such as duck from Quebec, Canadian lobster and truffles. You can order fresh and light items - Canadian Oysters (6/$22, 12/$42), Roasted Cauliflower Salad ($18) and Baby Kale Salad ($16) or indulge in heartier items - Short Rib Bites ($14), Croque-Monsieur ($19) with ham, gruyère and béchamel, and Prime Rib Burger ($23) with peameal bacon, smoked chessar and fried onions. If you usually shy away from pork belly because you can't stand all that fat in one bite, the Pork Belly Sliders ($18) will change how you feel about it. Meaty with just the right amount of chew, and topped with with a stunning Wiser’s Deluxe & maple glaze, slaw and a single onion ring, these sliders are worth crossing rushhour traffic for. Fancy Fish and Chips ($23) takes the old standard up a notch. Meaty moist meat from the lobster knuckle is coated in a thin, light crisp Mill St. Organic batter and served with a zesty aioli. Served in a newspaper cone with some fries added in for good measure, it's equal parts fun and fancy. Steak Frites ($28) is one of those dishes that is perfect year 'round. Steak is served medium rare and sliced topped with herbs and café de Paris butter for a touch of richness. A sleek cone of fries and jar filled with fresh salad completes the dish. Lobster Rolls ($22) can be cloying and heavy, but not here. Finely minced lobster is tossed lightly with just a little mayo, meyer lemon and tarragon and served in soft toasted buns - perfection. Get ready for a little getaway - you'll quickly be transported to the seaside. A variety of homemade desserts await you (including ice cream and sorbets, the renowned Ritz-Carlton Chocolate Cake,  Maple Crème Brûlée and Pot du Crème), if you still have room and be sure to check out the superb signature cocktails that include infused spirits, fresh fruit and herbs. DEQ Lounge, tucked away in the Ritz-Carlton Hotel, is one of the best spots to dine in the city. This quality at these prices with hotel service to boot? What are you waiting for?

By Stephanie Dickison

By Patricia Noonan April showers bring May flowers, Mother’s Day, Victoria Day, and in that floral mode, some pretty fabulous cocktails. I’ve been inspired to seek out just the sort of cocktails I would want to be sipping on in a Parisian café or lazy drinks for patio sipping. The Rose Martini at Le Paradis in the Annex neighbourhood uses the most wondrous rose liqueur from the south of France made by Edmond Briottet. It’s sensual and simple yet such an elegant cocktail that uses the liqueur instead of vermouth in this martini. It has the faintest tinge of pink and would make anyone look and feel stylish and sexy. Rose Martini 2 oz vodka ¼ oz Edmond Briottet Liqueur de Rose Method Add ingredients to a cocktail shaker filled with ice; stir and strain into well chilled cocktail glass. Maman, the wonderfully evocative take on a French country kitchen, tucked away on the second level of First Canadian Place, has a cocktail named Le Vert which can only be described as emerging summer with it’s refreshing cucumber infused spin on that classic sour cocktail, the Margarita. This is a perfect patio sipper and has an unusual salt-matcha green tea rim. The top of my list however, is Le Ti Punch - an elegant, complex cocktail packed with flavour. Le Ti Punch ¾ oz lime juice ¼ oz simple syrup ¼ oz Benedictine Liquor ½ oz Domaine de Canton Liqueur (ginger flavoured!) 1 3/4 oz Plantation Barbados Rum Method Combine all ingredients in a shaker glass with ice. Shake for 15 seconds. Double strain into a chilled cocktail glass or coupe. Garnish with a dehydrated lime wheel and serve. Maman is definitely a go-to destination for brunch for these or other expertly crafted drinks to enjoy with their French cuisine. And finally, although this is Italian in name, the theme is still floral and a beautiful cocktail idea to make for a Mother’s Day brunch at home. The original recipe calls for a white rose liqueur, but any rose liqueur can be used. Rosa Bianca 1 oz Campari 1 oz rose liqueur (Briottet rose liqueur is your best bet) 1 ½ oz orange juice 3-4 drops anise liqueur Method Pour all ingredients into a mixing glass filled with ice cubes, shake well then strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with anise. The Victoria Day holiday on May 23 is your chance to chill out with Victoria Gin, freshly rebranded and made right here in Canada. If floral, feminine drinks aren’t your cup of gin, then keep it simple with a good old G&T. Cheers!

By Adam Pesce For all of the different ways to make coffee (espresso, pour-over, immersion, electric brewers, etc) there are seemingly countless pieces of equipment to get the job done. And while each has its own idiosyncrasies, benefits and affects on the final cup of coffee you end up with, there is one particular piece of equipment that you probably don’t have, but most certainly need: a scale. For a long time, the marketing of coffee, whether it be roasting or brewing, has incorporated the romantic notion of "the art of coffee." In reality, making a great cup of coffee has far less to do with art than it does with science. As we strive not just to make our coffee taste good, but make it taste good consistently, us industry folk have come to the conclusion that measuring absolutely everything is the only way to go. So there are a few obvious necessities to make coffee: your brewer of choice, a grinder (burrs NOT blades) and hot water (more on this in a piece to come). Yes, you could figure out a way to "measure" things volumetrically ("If I put in two spoons full of coffee and pour water up to this line, it usually tastes okay."), but coffee beans come in different sizes and densities, your grinder won’t always be consistent, and there are dozens of additional factors that can affect the consistency of your brew if you are just eyeballing it. The benefit of measuring – and I’m talking about both your coffee AND water - is that you are taking a great deal of the guesswork out of brewing. Whenever I’m training a café or helping set up a coffee program, I always emphasize the importance of controlling all possible the variables. Once you know your recipe – the ratio of coffee to water (try 17:1 to start), grind size, time, brewing method, etc. – that gives you the cup of coffee you want, lock it in and repeat it every time. Weighing your coffee and water while brewing may seem like over-the-top advice from a coffee geek, and I often hear from people that they don’t have the time. It quite literally takes an extra 10 seconds to do it right. So, whether it be a top of the line and beautifully designed scale like the Acaia, or a cheap jewellers scale from your local hardware store, it’s a relatively small investment for better coffee. There are so many things we can’t control in this world – the weather, the plot of next few seasons of Game of Thrones, the possibility of a Trump presidency... so why not at least do everything you can to make amazing coffee every day?

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