7 sneaky ways to tone your arms in the kitchen

  1. Bake bread once a week. You'll strengthen your arms, shoulders and hands as you simultaneously soothe away stress. There's little more calming than the repetitive motion of kneading dough and nothing more pleasing than the smell of bread in the oven. Plus, home-baked bread – kneaded with your own two hands – tastes better than anything from the store or made in a bread maker.
  2. Make your own pizza dough instead of buying it pre-made. The forward and back action of using a rolling pin is a great arm and shoulder workout. And your family will thank you for your effort later, as no store-bought product compares to homemade.
  3. Trade in your electric mixer for a whisk and wooden spoon. You'll build arm strength as you use your own elbow grease to mix batter. Be sure to use both hands to work your arms evenly.
  4. Make an omelette rather than fried eggs. Fill it with at least three different vegetables, such as spinach, mushrooms and onions. You'll not only use your arms to whisk the eggs and chop the veggies, but you'll also improve your health by incorporating vegetables into your morning meal.
  5. Use a cast-iron pot for most of your cooking – and store it in the drawer under the oven. That way, you need to lift the heavy pot onto the stove each time you need it – building more arm strength with every meal.
  6. Have a large cleaver for everyday chopping and cooking. Professional chefs love cleavers for their weight and super-sharp, slightly rounded edge. Use one too and you'll give your hand and arm a great workout while you cook.
  7. Pour water out of a large jug. The weight of a large jug may do wonders for your arms (four litres/one gallon of water weighs more than three and a half kilograms/eight pounds). Bend your elbow and bring your hand to your shoulder five times before pouring.
7 sneaky ways to tone your arms in the kitchen
The material on this website is provided for entertainment, informational and educational purposes only and should never act as a substitute to the advice of an applicable professional. Use of this website is subject to our terms of use and privacy policy.
Close menu