Learn to dance an energetic quickstep

Though it evolved from the foxtrot and Charleston, the quickstep is a lively dance all its own. We'll teach you the rhythm and moves you'll need to tear up the ballroom.

Learn to dance an energetic quickstep

Learn the proper posture and movement

Because of the speed of this dance, you'll mostly be up on your toes for the quick steps and should move like a cat on hot bricks. Longer, slow steps are taken on the heel. Your upper body should remain smooth and unaffected as your feet work quickly underneath.

Always keep the rhythm in mind: slow-quick-quick-slow, slow-quick-quick-slow...

Get started

Engage your partner in a classic ballroom hold (the lady slightly offset to the man's right). The man leads, the lady follows. The example below shows the basic men's steps, without any turns around the floor. The woman's steps are the mirror image of these.

  • Slow: Take a good step forward with your right foot (1).
  • Quick-quick-slow: Now for a chassé (sidestep-slide-sidestep). Step forward and to the left with your left foot (2) and close your right foot to meet your left (3). Then, step left again with your left foot (4).
  • Slow: Take a long step back and to the left with your right foot (5).
  • Quick-quick-slow: Step back and to the left with your left foot (6) and close your right to meet your left (7). Then, take another step to the left with your left foot (8).

You've got it!

Change the angle

As you take any of the slow steps, try rotating your foot so that it lands at an angle to where it was originally pointing. You can then use this foot as a pivot to execute a simple turn. As you grow in confidence, you can also add "lock steps" by crossing one foot behind or in front of the other, and "variations" by throwing in some fast little hopping movements.

The quickstep is a relatively simple move with a lot of variations and room for creativity. So get out there, express yourself, and have fun!

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